Nigerian President Panders To Brazil’s New Racist Regime

The Pan-African Alliance has written extensively about the genocide against Blacks in Brazil for years. In our article titled “Hell in the ‘City of God’”: For Afro-Brazilians, Cops Are More Dangerous Than Street Gangs we wrote:

Because of the police — not drug gangs — Brazil is one of the most dangerous places on Earth for Black folks…

  • In Brazil, a Black child is killed by police every 23 minutes. And thats on a ‘good’ day.
  • Over 23,000 Black youths are killed in the country every year, BBC Brazil reports.
  • Black men are three times more likely to be killed than white men.
  • Close to half of the 50,000 youth deaths per year are suffered by teenage victims just 16 to 17 years old.
  • So many Black men have been killed in Brazil that there are now about 4 million more women than men in the country. Thats a population the size of Los Angeles.
  • More than one-fifth of Brazil’s 2016 police killings occurred in the state of Rio de Janeiro, which hosted the Summer Olympics last year. Police in the state killed 925 people ― 43 percent more than in 2015, outpacing the state’s 24 percent jump in overall homicides.
  • By raw numbers, the various forces that police Rio state ― including civil, military and pacification police ― are Brazil’s deadliest, and will likely kill even more people in 2017. By the end of August, they had killed at least 712 people, according to The Wall Street Journal, putting them on pace for more than 1,000 killings by year’s end.

So its baffling to us why Nigeria’s President Buhari would rush to pander to a man that has been called “Brazil’s Donald Trump”.

From Linda Ikeji’s Blog:

President Buhari has congratulated right-wing politician, Jair Bolsonaro on his victory in Brazil’s presidential election run-off on Sunday.

The President also felicitated with the people of Brazil for successfully going through the two rounds of the election and making their choice, thereby enhancing the democratic credentials of their country.

Buhari noted that Nigeria shares historical and cultural ties with Brazil and that his administration hoped for the deepening of such relations as well as expansion of current political, trade and military ties.

The Nigerian leader wished Bolsonaro, who will take office in January 2019 a successful tenure in confronting his country’s current socio-economic challenges.

Bolsonaro defeated his Leftist opponent Fernando Haddad of the Workers’ Party 55.5 per cent against 44.5 per cent of the votes with 96 per cent of ballots counted. Far-right Bolsonaro now has a task of leading Latin America’s biggest country and the world’s fourth-largest democracy to traditional Brazilian values which he promised during his campaign.

Bolsonaro, who cast himself as a political outsider despite a 27-year career in Congress, is the latest of several leaders around the globe to gain prominence by mixing tough, often violent talk with right-wing positions. But he also is very much a product of a political tempest in Brazil that made his messages less marginalised: widespread anger at the political class amid years of corruption, an economy that has struggled to recover after a punishing recession and a surge in violence.

The name of his party, PSL, translates to “Social Liberal Party,” although it largely abandoned its socially liberal platforms after he joined. Bolstering his rebel image is his reputation for offensive statements and sometimes extreme views, including insulting women, and black people.

Written by Asad Malik

Asad is the Executive Officer of The Pan-African Alliance, and the Founder of United Black America.

Leave a Reply

avatar

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
Notify of